Violet

Certainly not the best photograph ever made.  The sky was a little heavy to the south.  I attribute that to the sunset, which produced a brilliant and fiery pink and yellow sky to the west, but that meant the sun was obscured by the atmosphere.  The result: the southern sky went darker faster than I would have liked and there was not enough light on the skyline.  

Interestingly, a couple walking by suggested I turn the camera toward the west.  I knew it wasn't a photograph, but I gave it a try.  The problem:  The apartment buildings facing me and the park had no light on them, so they were simply black rectangles, and not very interesting ones.

This is a photograph that proves that it is worth waiting for the right sunset, which could be tomorrow, next week, or in a month.  I am reminded of the series of photographs that Richard Misrach made of the Golden Gate Bridge over the course of one year.  I believe those photographs were made from his yard somewhere in the Berkeley area.  Whatever.  Misrach demonstrated  that landscapes are all about light and how it interacts with the atmosphere.  I shall return.

I am standing at the northern end of Diversey Harbor where the motorboats are moored for the summer.  Belmont Harbor is about a mile three-quarters of a mile north.  It is one of the area harbors that caters to sailboats.  I like Diversey Harbor in the winter, when it is filled with Canadian geese. 

The last landscape photograph I posted to my Chicago Journal was of the Board of Trade Building.  I had never noticed before, but from this spot, you can look straight down LaSalle Street, with the Board of Trade Building clearly visible--about a quarter of away in from the photograph's right side.

Goldberg's River City

Goldberg's River City

Canyon

Canyon