Dr. Lonnie Smith

Dr. Lonnie Smith

Woke up at 12:30PM today, worked on photographs, and then headed back to Joe Segal's Jazz Showcase for seconds.  Dr. Lonnie Smith and Company were still in the house.

There was some similarity in today's set to Friday night's sets, so I will refer you to my earlier review.   The big difference was the amount of commentary following the songs, which might have been due to the fact that this is the famous Sunday "Save the Children's" matinee, so there were lots of kids in the house.

After a number entitled "And the World Weeps," Smith explained all of his facial expressions.  He explained that he and the other musicians were excited.  He then proceeded to play the lead line in much slower tempo, explaining that this is why the number would have sounded like had he not been excited.  It sounded pretty good to me either way.

What was most notable was how Smith ended his set.  He asked the audience if anyone had questions, which led to a 20-minute discussion about the history of jazz organ.  Smith credited Jimmy Smith as being the original innovator.  He then showed how Jimmy Smith, Jack McDuff, and Jimmy McGriff differed, focusing on how each hit the organ's keys.  A little girl then asked what the pedals were for.  Smith obligingly gave a demonstration, which ended with him demonstrating how he could make the organ sound like a trumpet.  He then wanted to perform a new song that the band apparently hadn't quite mastered.  Even though Wayne was telling them that they needed to stop, Smith couldn't help but get a few bars in.  A great musician and a helluva human being.

For those photographers following along, all of the color photographs in this series were captured with the Fuji GFX 50s medium format camera.  The RAW files were pretty dark, so you can see just how expansive the camera's dynamic range is.  I am amazed.

 

Firecakes

Firecakes

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